curseworm:

anarratorofnogreatskill:

retromomentofgypsywhatever:

I got this at a pro life convention in my sophomore year of high school

I got one at my university my senior year.

My roommates were horrified.

sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby. sticky baby. butter baby.

I couldn’t help but think again that some problems might have been at least partially headed off if anyone had pointed some things out to me growing up.

Including that there are actual reasons some people will not fit into single digit clothing sizes, beyond the ever-popular “lack of sufficient determination” 😵 No matter how hard a person might try, things like ribcages and shoulders are pretty hard size limits.

(Even proceeding off the assumption that the base expectations are reasonable, which of course they are not. At all.)

What’s even more disturbing, though, is the number of otherwise mostly rational adults who do not seem to understand this–or want to. Including my mother with her own body issues, the best I can figure, but that’s a story of its own.

rowantheexplorer:

greenekangaroo:

golbatgender:

jezi-belle:

sea-dilemma:

lolotehe:

serbianslayer:

mightbeunknown:

uacboo:

From Twitter.

is it weird that as i got through the tweet my understanding of it lessens?

If you had a recent ancestor who went through starvation it actually altered their genetics and may have passed down genes to you that make you hold on to fat. So this tweet is more accurate than you’d think.

More on that.

Seriously, my body is expecting the next ice age.

OH MY FUCKING GOD.

MY FUCKING GREAT GRANDFATHER LITERALLY FLED LEBANON DUE TO A FUCKING FAMINE AND MY GRANDMOTHER AND DAD AND I ARE ALL FAT AS FUCKING HELL.

FUCK ME RUNNING I DID NOT KNOW THIS.

…That’s going to apply also to anyone whose recent ancestors voluntarily dieted a lot, isn’t it. Diet culture long-term causes more obesity. Sure, it takes decades to show up, but anything you’d hear today about childhood obesity would reflect that. Exercising is still very good for most people, but trying to lose weight shouldn’t be the goal for most people, because a) it usually doesn’t work very well or it comes back and b) your kids or grandkids could end up with extra wonky metabolisms. (And while fat itself is actually not that much of a problem if you keep your fitness up, it can be hard on your joints. That’s actually the biggest health risk if you’re “small end of fat,” under 40, and active–joint problems.)

THAT MOTHERFUCKING ARTIFICIAL FAMINE THAT’S IT I’M GONNA FIGHT THE ENGLISH 

Honestly, “I’m gonna fight the English” is a good reaction to a lot of things.

inspirelocked:

fieldthistle:

fuckingniall:

writing conclusions in papers is like the stupidest thing ever though like what’s the point of dedicating an entire paragraph to “so yeah i know you just read my paper but this is a summarization of what you read in case you need to be reminded about what you just read” like why can’t the paper just end 

I keep seeing this post and similar ones, and if y’all’s teachers and professors have left you with the idea that a conclusion is a summary, they have failed you in a big way.

Your conclusion is your “so what’s the fucking point” section. You’ve given you’re reader a lot of info and now they need to know why they care. Depending on the type of paper you should be giving a plan of action, explaining how this knowledge changes our understanding of the topic, link your paper to other disciplines, suggest further areas of study, etc.

One of the best pieces of writing advice I’ve ever received is that if you can’t envision yourself dropping the mic and strutting off stage at the end of your conclusion then it’s probably not strong enough.

“So whats the fucking point” is more helpful than all 6 years I’ve probably been writing papers

larkandkatydid:

“Jingle-Jangle” is actually a technical term is social science research that describes the challenge of measuring/describing/agreeing on important sociological concepts because either people are using different words to describe the same experience (jingle) and/or they are using the same words to describe very different experiences (jangle).  

(it also could be the reverse. I’m not looking it up to double check)

In my work we keep getting caught in the jingle-jangle jungle around the term “empathy”.  Really. I swear. I’m not just beating you over the head with the lessons of this cryptic parable. I really did have to spend 2 hours this week debating the difference between “empathy” and “listening”.  Oh, you think that’s obvious but IT IS NOT!

Anyway, it’s a real term for a real thing that happens all the fucking time and if you don’t notice it happening you will find yourself arguing with people you don’t actually disagree with.